Friday, August 31, 2012

Book Feature -- He Ain't Lion

Morning All,

Today we are featuring He Ain't Lion by Celia Kyle.

--x--
 Life sucks… And then you get turned into a werelion…

Curvaceous, blonde bombshell Maya Josephs is looking for a little action to take her mind off of her recent break-up. Crazy werecats or not, an evening at Genesis is exactly what she needs. And when she meets the hotter than hot, super-sexy owner, Alex O’Connell, the alpha lion shifter is just the man to fit the bill for a one-night stand.

Dumped like a rotting piece of meat by her ex, Maya is on the prowl, fixin' to do whatever it takes to get herself a piece of the gorgeous furball. Besides, what’s the harm in a girl having a little bit of fun?
--x-

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wishing Celia Kyle all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Book Feature -- Hatred Ridicule and Contempt

Morning All,

Today I have, David Cooper featuring his book  Hatred, Ridicule and Contempt
--x--
 Called upon to defend an acrimonious libel action on behalf of an important newspaper client, newly appointed law firm partner Alex Harris never once expected to find his efforts impeded by wanton disregard for ethics and blatant self interest that crossed all boundaries. Not only on the part of his opponents, but also those he should have been able to trust implicitly and without question...

What must he do to withstand the onslaught against his clients’ interests – and his own? How far, in his battles both external and internal, would he be able to resist the pressure to sacrifice principles for expediency? To reject integrity and fall into line? To forego a rocky and twisted path in favour of a quiet life?

Hatred, Ridicule and Contempt. A high calibre courtroom drama with many unexpected twists as one man stands up against conformity and the easy way out.


--x--


Wishing David Cooper all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Book Feature -- Excuse Me, My Brains Have Stepped Out

Morning  All,

Today,  I have Pandora Poikilos' Excuse Me, My Brains Have Stepped Out.

--x--
 Anya Michaels is having the time of her life. She has the man of her dreams by her side. She has graduated at the top of her class. She has the job others were lining up for. Between late night drinks at her favourite bar and fancy dinners at the most expensive restaurants, she has a string of adoring friends. Everything changes when she hears the dreaded words, "You are sick."

Being diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder, her world starts to fall apart, one piece at a time. Now dumped, her four year relationship is nothing but a memory filled with pictures, thoughts and a very broken heart. Her job becomes an even further challenge as she tries to hide her condition. Her friends suddenly have more important things to do, what is a party without a party girl? Perfect could not crumble any faster.

Soon, caught between situations, people and pieces of life that she never dreamed of planning for herself, Anya begins to wonder if her brain condition is all that bad. As she absorbs the changes in her life and realization sets in, she begins to wonder if she is the only one saying: Excuse Me, My Brains Have Stepped Out.
--x--
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Wishing Pandora Poikilos all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Guest Post -- Tim Andrewartha

Morning All,

Today I have Tim Andrewartha the author of Vitality doing a guest post for us. Here we go:

--x--
My Novel & Real Life
by Tim Andrewartha


People often ask me how much of my dystopian soft drink novel Vitality is based on real life. To which I usually stroke my sideburns and take a sip of my drink, before giving them any number of different answers. These depend on my mood, the weather, and even the day of the week.  They can also contain more fiction than my novel. Today though, exclusively for this guest blog post, I’m going to answer this question truthfully, and wholeheartedly. Because you, the people of internet land, deserve to know.

Firstly, in Vitality, the protagonist, Stylo Green, moves to a large and unfamiliar city. In 2006 I moved from the UK to Japan. At first I wasn’t actually living in Tokyo, but it was just a short train ride from the humungous and – at the time – unfamiliar city. So it’s fair to say that a certain amount of that is based on my own experience.

However, the city in Vitality – which is purposefully unnamed and ambiguously located – is an unfriendly and unsettling place which gives Stylo the creeps. Tokyo is nothing like that. It’s an exciting, vibrant place full of interesting people, which is why I have now moved to the city and I enjoy living here very much. I suppose some of the trendy places that Stylo goes to with Dack, and perhaps even the Earth Club, could be compared with some of the bars and clubs in Tokyo, but generally speaking the two cities are very different.

Secondly, Stylo moved to the city to start a new job. I also moved to Japan to start a new job. So again this is something that draws on my own experience. But whereas Stylo starts working  as a graphic designer for Vitality – a mysterious company that is making a purple drink they claim will change people’s lives – I started working as an English teacher.

So those are the two main things that bear some resemblance with my life, that I think influenced me a bit when I originally sat down to write Vitality. The biggest difference being that moving to a new place and starting a new job was a completely positive experience for me, but this can’t be said for poor Stylo. However, that’s what creating fiction is all about – writing about your own experiences and added conflicts to make it into a story that people will want to read.

There are also some things that have happened after I wrote Vitality that have reminded me of my novel. For a while I was working in a very modern building which reminded of Vitality HQ, but of course purple liquid didn’t flow through the walls, neither did any of my colleagues have a pet monkey. And, the other day when I was in Nagano, I tried some wasabi beer which was green like the beer in the Earth Club.

There may be other things in Vitality that have some resemblance to my life. I just can’t think of them right now. But if you want to ask me about any specific thing in Vitality, please feel free to leave a comment and I will answer as best as I can.
--x--

wishing Vitality all success
Abhishek Boniapalli


Guest Post -- Charlie Courtland

Morning All,

Today I have Charlie Courtland the author of Dandelions in the Garden doing a guest post for us. Here we go.
--x--

Help! My Inner Genius Took A Sabbatical!
by Charlie Courtland


What do you do when your inner creative genius is lacking inspiration?  Most writers panic!  Writer’s block can be absolutely paralyzing and all consuming.  At first, it seems like a temporary annoyance that we will get over if we just take a deep breath and focus.  However, when it lingers writers start avoiding all questions relating to work.  The number one most dreaded question, “What are you currently working on or what is your next project?”  For the writers who are flying along on the keyboard, this is an exciting topic.  However, for those starring aimlessly at the screen or out the window, this is horrifying.

So what is writer’s block and what causes it?  Writer’s block is a condition in which an author loses the ability to produce new work.  Writer’s block varies in intensity and can range from trivial or temporary, to extremely difficult and career ending.  The Purdue Online Writing Lab says, "Because writers have various ways of writing, a variety of things can cause a writer to experience anxiety, and sometimes this anxiety leads to writer's block.”

Some common causes
Overwhelmed – If this is your first book, the prospect of producing anything that anyone might want to read can be overwhelming.  Try not to think about writing the next bestseller or popular novel.  Instead, start with small goals, break the novel up into pieces and work on parts at a time.  If this is not your first novel, you could suffer from the one-hit-wonder doubter living in your head, or if your first project took some hits, you may think perhaps your genius isn’t what you thought it was.  Again, don’t try to re-create the wheel.  Start small and work from there.  Take into consideration comments about previous works and try to improve, but don’t let them completely change your style, voice or vision.  Remember, you have fans and they like what you do for a reason.  Critics have their place, but make it a small one.  Put them in a mental cubby in the corner of your brain.

Nothing seems interesting. Oh no! You realized the topic or plot bores you.  You thought you had a great idea, but now it just seems lame or uninteresting.  The best advice I can give, and it’s very hard to do, especially if you’re excited about the subject is DO NOT TALK ABOUT IT, to anyone!  I mean this with all my heart!  Much like a dream, if you talk about it, it fizzles or someone starts giving input that just kills the entire idea or influences it into the wastebasket of great ideas gone bad.

I just don’t have the time – Too much real life is getting in the way!  This seems to be a very common reason. Most of us don’t have a writing cabin in the woods and six months of complete isolation.  The most difficult part of writing is finding the time.  It’s a process and it demands chunks of time many of us don’t have.  My recommendation, make time.  Try to schedule writing time on a daily or weekly basis.  Turn off the phone, hang a sign on the door, duct tape the doorbell – do anything you must to decrease interruptions.  When inspiration strikes and it’s not scheduled – lets face it, this is 99% of the time, drop what you are doing and at the very least jot down ideas, dialogue, and scenes on paper.  I’ve got piles of napkins, envelopes and even fast food wrappers with notes on them.  I take them to my office and work off of them when time permits.  Half my novels were written when I was not at my desk.  Remember, it’s okay to be eccentric when writing.  Stop worrying about what others might think and jot that idea down, NOW!

Anxiety – self-conscious – failure, rejection.  For first time writers fear of not being taken seriously or rejection can be crippling.  For writers working on the second, third or fourth novel, previous critics, poor reviews or poor sales can be just as paralyzing.  Believe it or not, I’ve let some comments get so far into my writer’s brain that I can hardly remember if I should or should not use a comma.  I have to remind myself not to worry about it during the first phase of creative writing.  Sometimes I purposely write a badly constructed and grammatically incorrect sentence just for the fun of it.  This tends to loosen me up enough to move forward.

What to do – try not to panic!
Place the inner panic monster on the shelf.

Free write – Don’t worry about writing the novel, just write something.
If you use research materials, put them beside your keyboard.  Read through them with your fingers on the keyboard. As you read, allow yourself to simply react to the material.  Type notes of any kind for example: explain, speculate, relate, add too, clarify, argue with, rant or agree with the research.  I’ve come up with some great thematic threads by doing this during the writing process.

Simply write dialogue – start with a conversation between characters. Who says you have to start at the beginning?  Honestly, it’s best and much more productive if you don’t.  I don’t recall ever starting at the beginning, even when I thought I was.  Somehow, I always end up switching and revising chapters.  Don’t fret, this can really produce some great ideas and give direction.

Don’t sit in front of a computer when you begin to write.  Write invisibly.  I keep a small note pad with me at all times.  Much like daydreaming, try writing when you are driving, showering, lying on the couch with your eyes closed, sitting in the sun, going for a walk and throwing toys to your dog.  Walking around my property with my dogs is what I do to clear my mind.  I also go for long drives.  The key is to cut your self off from visual reinforcement of blocking or distraction—typically, the blank white screen. 
--x--

Wishing Dandelions in Garden a huge success,
Abhishek Boinapalli

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Author Interview - Emlyn Chand

Morning All,

Today we have Emlyn Chand, the author of Farsighted and OpenHeart answering a few questions to us. Here we go:

--x--


Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book.
If you’re looking for a YA read that tackles the real-life problems associated with being a teen (bulimia, bullying, parents – to name a few) and also has a compelling paranormal aspect, then look no further!

What inspired you to want to become a writer?
Um, hello! I was born a writer, of course. Just look at my twitter bio: Emlyn Chand emerged from the womb with a fountain pen grasped firmly in her left hand (trust story). In all seriousness, I’ve been writing since before I could write, if you know what I mean. I’ve always loved inventing stories or “tall tales” as my parents call them. Writing became my career about three years ago when the local paper offered me a book review column and the dream fulfillment that came along with it. That gave me the courage and consistency to write novels. Open Heart is my third written, but second published.

Any other books in the works? Goals for future projects?
You can count on me to always have at least half a dozen balls in the air. My current project is Fall Back, the first book in a new YA science fiction series called The Timewalker Chronicles. I’m having a blast getting to know this new set of characters, but I also look forward to transitioning back to the Farsighted series and writing the third installment, Pitch.

What is one book everyone should read?
My favorite book is A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving, definitely. The novel has so many layers and entertains on so many levels. Also the characters in that novel seem more real than those from any other I’ve ever read. It’s just beautiful—that’s the only word for it. This one book everyone should attempt regardless of genre preference.

Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.
Hearing someone liked my book. Yes, it’s as simple as that. Farsighted has won something like ten awards now, and each of those makes me feel great, because it means someone got what I was trying to do and appreciated it. I also love it when fans email me or connect with me on Twitter and Facebook—those simple little things make my day so bright. Don’t forget to reach out to your favorite authors; we just love it!

What was your favorite book when you were a child/teen?
The book that changed my life is Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crocket Johnson. It opened my eyes to the world that could exist if only I was willing to create it—I think it’s what encouraged me to be a writer in the first place. I became an avid reader when I discovered Babysitter’s Little Sister by Anne M Martin at the age of 7. I used to read 2 of them per day!

What's one piece of advice you would give aspiring authors?
Something’s gotta give. If writing is important, you’ll move around other aspects of your life to get it done. You have to. Writing is not something you can do with just a little bit of effort. To get through the first draft, editing, what-have-you, you'll have to work hard! Yes, you could space it out over several years, but if you want to finish anytime this year, you’re going to have to make sacrifices. For me, this was less time with friends and family, less television, and less attention to my health (eating right and exercising).

 When you were little, what did you want to be when you "grew up"?
When I was really little, I planned on being a zoo keeper. In elementary school, I was going to be a Disney animator. In high school, I was going to be a lawyer. And in my early years of college, I was going to be Ambassador to Russia :-)

What's the craziest writing idea you've had?
Most of my ideas are zany! The zaniest is probably the first I ever had. At the tender, innocent age of 15, I started writing a feminist slasher based on Frankenstein—a woman is driven mad with grief and become a serial date killer, murdering men with features that look like those of her deceased husband in an attempt to rebuild him. I was such a simple, sweet kid ;-)

Who or what inspired you to become an author?
My genes or maybe the compulsion to be a writer is some form of mental illness. Whatever the cause, I can definitely say that I was born this way.
--x--

wishing Emlyn Chand all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Monday, August 27, 2012

Author Interview - Keira Michelle Telford

Morning All,

Today, I have Keira Michelle Telford, the author  SILVER: Acheron (A River of Pain) of doing an interview for us. Here we go:

--x--
Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book.
Because, deep down, everyone wants to believe in the power of enduring love.

Any other books in the works? Goals for future projects?
At the moment, I’m working on the fifth book in the SILVER Series, which will comprise ten books in its entirety. There are seven books in the first part of the series, collectively called The Amaranthe Chronicles. I hope that this part of the series will be completed by the end of 2012. The second part of the series, The Outlier Trilogy, will be released in 2013.

Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.
Being a Quarterfinalist in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award contest.

Is there a song you could list as the theme song for your book or any of your characters?

For Acheron overall, it would be: Emilie Autumn – I Want My Innocence Back. For Ella ‘Silver’ Cross specifically, it would be: Emilie Autumn – Opheliac.


What's one piece of advice you would give aspiring authors?
I’m going to steal this advice from Emilie Autumn:
“You can’t use the people around you as a judge of what you do. If you do it, you’d better be f---ing strong enough to just do it the way that you want. And if you’re not, then don’t get out there and sell it.”

Can you see yourself in any of your characters?
All of them. Silver is my arrogance, my defiance, my addiction, my strength and my greatest weakness. Alex is my heart – the soppy, romantic part that believes in eternal love. Luka is my guilty pleasure, lusting after women in a way that only a lovable rogue like him could get away with. Maydevine is my sense and reason, and my level-headedness. Alice is my manipulation and my selfishness.

Which authors have influence you most and how?
Samuel Beckett’s work encouraged me to explore a more abstracted style of writing, and taught me how powerful a metaphor can be. Edgar Allan Poe nurtured my love of the macabre, and taught me how great passion and great sorrow are inextricably linked.
--x--
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Wishing Keira Telford all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Book Feature -- Whoriculture by M Mancio

Morning All,

Today I feature Whorticulture by M Mancio.

--x--
As a girl waits for the return of her disappeared father, the story of four migrant women unravels. In antebellum America: a daydreamer from the country gets an unexpected education on the Mississippi river; a storekeeper falls in love with a thief amid the chaos of Gold Rush San Francisco; a fugitive quadroon re-invents herself in a New York brothel; and a young bride is trapped on a Louisiana sugar plantation.

Though they do not know it, their lives are inextricably linked by the men they encounter. Peopled by whores, tricksters, gamblers, do-gooders, liars, and fools, and with allusions to the coded language of flowers, Whorticulture is about prostitution in its myriad forms. Contains a helpful discussion guide for book groups and a flower dictionary.
--x--

with warm regards
Abhishek Boinapalli

Author Interview -- Waiting Game

Morning All,

Today I have JL Ficks & JE Dugue the authors of Waiting Game donig an author interview for us. Here we go:



--x--

When you were little, what did you want to be when you "grew up"?
A white Michael Jordan. I fell well short of that mark…

Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book.
Because Dark Elven assassins are cool…

Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.
J. L. Ficks: My three-year-old son felt he needed to defend my book from others. He saw me checking so many proofs that when we finally took it to market, he’d tear a book out of a buyer’s hands and say, “That’s my daddy’s book!” Of course, I kept my son from truly stealing anyone’s Covent purchases, but I was deeply touched by his small-hearted devotion to his father nonetheless.

If you could jump in to a book, and live in that world.. which would it be?
J. L. Ficks: Mmmm…maybe Candy Land provided I could go in under a guaranteed “don’t get fat” clause. Definitely not Covent…I would get killed far too fast in my world!

What's one piece of advice you would give aspiring authors?
J. L. Ficks: Put something on a page. I have a lot of aspiring authors who ask me how I produce so much content (I’ve got the full manuscripts done for over four books and I’m still going). I always tell them to never stare at a blank page. If you’re not feeling it, sketch out an outline or write some dialogue like it’s a screenplay. Just don’t EVER do nothing because you’ll get a whole lot of nowhere. Ideas can get other ideas flowing so just put something on a page. A skeleton of a story can form before you put the real meat on the body. You just might need that framework to get your creativity going.

Hidden talent?
J. L.: I can climb an 11/12 pitch roof without ropes or a harness. I’ve had roofers offer me jobs, seriously. I was a Catastrophe Adjuster for over half a decade. Sometimes I take my laptop up on my roof and pop out a few chapters. Ok, ok, that last part was kind of a stretch.

If someone wrote a book about your life, what would the title be?
J. L. Ficks: The Great Fool. I like the irony of it. Plus, my imagination just sweeps me away, which causes me to walk into the occasional wall because I’m too busy daydreaming. Dang that hurt!

Who or what inspired you to become an author?
J. L. Ficks: Each other. J. E. grew up together. Our imaginations feed off one another. We used to spend hours in our childhood just venturing around town and dreaming up all sort of crazy boaaaaaaayhood adventures. Writing just naturally followed as we found more mature ways to express our imaginations.

--x--

Do not forget to enter the following giveaway


Wishing Waiting Game all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Friday, August 24, 2012

Guest Post -- Rob Andrews

Morning All,

Today I have Rob Andrews, the author of Wispy telling us what Writing To Him is
--x--
I thought about this for a few moments and thought to myself, is this a test?  Perhaps Orangeberry is actually a means for separating the literary wheat from the chaff?  The real writers will eschew the use of a pre-fab list and let their vivid imaginations have play across the full field of possibilities that float in the collective ether we inhabit when we begin our author/reader dance.  

Somewhere, I imagined a secret panel, a board of august publishers, agents and editors, ensconced in some suitably high-tech and atmospheric chamber, who looked upon the Orangeberry Summer Splash and nodded sagaciously as one poor schmuck after another took the bait and went down the path of non-creativity.  I can see their silver heads, heavy with the weight of countless years of experience nodding in sad unison as writer after writer succumbs to the option not to take the road less travelled.  With a resigned air, they shuffle another marker into the cosmic slush pile of those who failed to make the lowest standard; the pikers who balked at the most basic test they could provide. 

            “Didn’t even choose their own topic?”  the lady on the left murmurs, the rhetorical question hanging unanswered in the blue smoke of the lofty chamber (writing judges also hold in contempt the non smoking laws that apply to lesser humans.)

            “Who’s next?” asks the silver haired governor as he pours a Hemingwayesque tot of Teacher’s scotch.

            “Deplorable.”  Snorts a rheumy eyed octogenarian, tugging unconsciously at his bow-tie, his glance already extended to the next participant like a prayer.

Of course, I could be completely wrong … sooooo

Writing to me is … a dance.

When I write, we get to dance – you and I.  How did we get on the same dance card?  You picked up what I wrote.
When you did, you joined me on the dance floor.
I wrote the music and set out what I thought the steps would be, but you brought your own interpretations to the dance and subtly created nuances I never envisioned and in so doing, altered the dance; changed how you navigated the space I had created for us.

When I write, the characters and I get to dance – they and I.  As most writers know, we, like Viktor Frankenstein, created them, but once given life, they can become … unpredictable.  They say the darnedest things.  They take the story and the plot and themselves into places we hadn’t at first imagined for them.  It is the best part of writing for me – watching them pull tendrils of connections from our collective ether and weave a richer and more integrated tale by their thoughts, words and deeds. 

Dancing fits.

I sure hope I was wrong about that panel though …
--x--

What is writing to you? A stress buster, a much needed tool to speak up, ...??? Do let me know.

Don't forget to join the give-away here:

with warm regards
Abhishek Boinapalli 

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Guest Post -- A.K. McKay

Morning All,

Today I have A. K. McKay, the author of  Tommy Tippett,  doing a guest post for us titled "gen·re – adjective, noun" Here we go:

--x--

A class or category of artistic endeavour having a particular form, content, technique, or the like: the genre of epic poetry; the genre of symphonic music.
It now appears to me that the easiest part of writing a book is the actual writing! I flew through the writing stage of my book. The words flowed and I thought that the writing caper was a jaunt.

Unhappily I was bought to earth with a thud when I realised that it all became so much harder when the writing was finished, even more so for an independent author who has to arrange everything for themselves.
The conclusion of the story was just the start of the journey to get the book published.

One of the biggest problems I have faced in getting my book, Tommy Tippett  noticed was to understand and label the books genre.
For most authors the task of selecting their books genre is a relatively easy one. The subject matter and the storyline of the book falls neatly into an established genre.

Correctly selecting the genre of your book is extremely important as it directs the reader to your work. A reader of horror stories isn’t going to search in the humour genre for their next purchase.

All of my research informs me that selecting the most appropriate genre is paramount to the books success. The incorrect genre label can be a death knell to a books success.

I have been asked many times what is the genre of your book Tommy Tippett? My answer is always the same.....I don’t really know!
The book can’t be easily pigeon-holed. It is the story of a young boy growing up in a beachside suburb of Sydney, Australia in the 1960’s. There is an innocence to the story that would relate well to the young adult market. So put it there I hear you say!

It could sit there but I don’t see the young adult genre as the books main audience.

Later in the book the situation turns a little grim, nothing at all a teenager hasn’t read a hundred times before, but to my mind this turns the book away from young adult to a more adult read.

Totally confused by the genre label for my book I turned to others for help and advice which, when forthcoming confused me even more. I was told it was everything from Christian fiction through to adult fiction, family fiction through to fantasy.

Now I was really confused.

I had to make a decision about the genre when I was uploading Tommy Tippett to Amazon. None of the drop-downs in the genre menu really applied to the book. In the end I basically fired a shot in the dark and submitted the book grudgingly in the young adult genre. I was then, and I am not now happy with the genre under which the book sits.  Sales are slow which maybe an indication that I have the genre completely wrong.

If there is any moral to this it is if you write a book try and understand from the outset the genre your book fits into. By doing so, you will save yourself a lot of angst and anxiety.
--x--


Book Feature -- Hot And Spicy

Morning All,

 Today I  am sharing the book blurb of Hot and Spicy by PT Macias

--x--
Jose Enrique De La Cruz the CEO of the De La Cruz, Inc. needs a fiancée in time for the 25th anniversary celebration. La familia is anxious to meet his fiancée, but he doesn’t have one. His hermana Patricia agreed to obtain una novia for him. Paty enticed her amiga to pretend to be his loving fiancée.

Jessica Maria Acosta agreed to be his fiancée for two reasons. One, she has always loved him and prays she can make him love her. Two, this is a great opportunity to achieve her dream of working as an Interior Decorator Design Manager. 
--x--
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Wishing HOT AND SPICY all the best
Abhishek Boinapalli

Monday, August 20, 2012

Author Interview -- Cate Dean

Morning all, 

    Today I have Cate Dean the author of Rest for the Wicked doing an interview for us.

 --x--
What inspired you to want to become a writer?
I have been writing since I can remember, but the fact I write shorter fiction really hampered me when I started shopping my work to agents. When I found out about the self-publishing platforms, the skies opened up and I saw my own future laid out in front of me – with me in control. I am a bit of a control freak, so that really appealed. ;)

Any other books in the works? Goals for future projects?
I just released book 2 of The Claire Wiche Chronicles, A Gathering of Angels. I also have a YA fantasy coming out later this month, The Barricade. Future projects include book 3 in the Claire Wiche series in time for Halloween, and a sequel to my first release, When Walls Can Talk, coming out in time for the holidays.

What was your favourite book when you were a child/teen?
A Wrinkle in Time, hands down. Not only did it introduce me to fantasy/sci fi, the characters became friends, ones I still visit. I will always love that book – and I still have my dog eared, well-read original copy.

Is there a song you could list as the theme song for your book or any of your characters?
Carry On Wayward Son is the theme song for this book. I always listen to music when I write, because I cannot write in complete silence. It gives me instant writer’s block.

What's one piece of advice you would give aspiring authors?
Have someone else read your work – every time. Whether it’s bets readers, an editor, a proofreader, don’t put it out there without taking this step. You are not objective, and you never will be when it comes to your own writing. My betas are a precious commodity, and every one of my books are better for their input.

Can you see yourself in any of your characters?
I am most like Claire, but her best friend, Annie – she says out loud the things I say in my head. Love her!

If you could jump in to a book, and live in that world . . . which would it be?
Any of the Amelia Peabody books by Elizabeth Peters. Egypt, archaeology, murder, mystery, intrigue – those books have it all! It would be an absolute ball to live in the world she created.
 
--x--
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 A giveaway for you all. Do enter.

 
Wishing Cate Dean all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Sunday, August 19, 2012

Author Interview -- PG Forte

Hello All,

Today, I also have PG Forte the author of Scent of Roses, answering a few questions for us. Here we go:

--x--
Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book. 
Because it will (hopefully) transport you to a world that’s almost like this one, only better.


Any other books in the works? Goals for future projects?
I always have books in the works. Right now, I’m working on the next book in my Children of Night (vampire) series along with a steampunk, a sci-fi and a short holiday story.


What inspired you to want to become a writer?
I don’t know. I’ve always written. Before I could write, I made up stories in my head. I like to think it has something to do with my part Irish background. Maybe there were Bards in my family tree?


Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.
Having a reader tell me she loves my books. And, yes, it’s actually happened a couple of times now, but it’s always such an amazing surprise. I love it.

Is there a song you could list as the theme song for your book or any of your characters?

Oh, yeah. For Scout and Nick both Your Wildest Dreams and I Know You’re Out There Somewhere by the Moody Blues. For their love scenes: El Farol by Santana. For the fair scenes, Equos Fair by David Arkenstone and for general atmosphere, the soundtrack from the movie A Walk on the Moon.


What's one piece of advice you would give aspiring authors?
I’ve said this many times, but I still believe it’s true. “You don’t have to write the best book in the world, just the best book that’s in you.” Too many would-be authors stay would-be authors because they never finish that first book. Write the best book you can and then, when that’s done, sit down and write the next book. And make that one the best you can write—you, not someone else, just you.



Can you see yourself in any of your characters?
Oh, yeah. I see a lot of me in most of them…not the psychos so much, I hope. lol! I actually worry sometimes about how much like me they seem.



Finish the sentence- one book I wish I had written is....
Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier. I love the characters, the settings, the conceit of never even naming your main character, the whole idea of how much power some people can wield, even from beyond the grave. Oh, and it’s got one of the most memorable opening lines of all time.
--x--
Wishing all success to Scent of the Roses
Abhishek Boniapalli

Book Feature -- Convicted

Morning All,

   Today, we are featuring Convicted by  Tim Hughes. Here is the book blurb.

--x--
Join our hero, Declan Elliot, as he struggles to survive the brutalities of America in 2025. On the way home from work one evening, Declan's life changes forever. The night's events thrust him headlong into a perilous journey fraught with murder, catastrophic weather and out of control crime. In this 21st century retelling of the classic parable of the Good Samaritan, Declan battles to overcome rejection, betrayal and a high powered politician who will stop at nothing to see him dead.  With his faith tested and his spirit under attack, how will our hero respond?
--x--
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Hoping all success to convicted
Abhishek Boinapalli

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Guest Post -- Paul Rice

Morning All,

 Today I have Paul Rice the author of Pimp Ur Blog Episode Two who helps many a bloggers in their blogging efforts. Here you go:

--x--

I priced the third eBook of the Pimp ur Blog series, Pimp ur Blog Episode Three: Working with Amazon and Google, as FREE! for the month of July 2012. Many authors price the first book of a series as free to coincide with the release of subsequent books. I wanted to get as wide of a distribution as I could at the initial release of Episode Three in order to attract other co-authors to share their experiences on these two wide-open topics.
free, free books, free goods
Free Flower

I was influenced primarily by the research done by Dan Ariely in The Cost of Zero Cost chapter of his Predictably Irrational book. His evidence pointed to FREE! as a price point all by itself.

He set up experiment after experiment to show how much people desire something that is FREE! No matter what it was – chocolate, or some other food; beer, or some other drink; health care, or some other service – the majority of people prefer FREE!

I coincidentally was influenced in my decision by the findings in Dr. Arthur Janov’s Primal Healing book. He states many times how a person’s unmet needs never go away. The context of these unmet needs is most often in infancy and early childhood, when we have to have the unconditional love and attention of our parents.
free, freebie, free goods
Power Of Free

The juxtaposition of these two influences resulted in my realization that the reason people are so attracted to the FREE! price point is probably due to our histories. An infant or child who does not receive the freely given love and attention he or she needs will be driven by those needs to acquire substitutes throughout the rest of their life.

I was not persuaded by Dan Ariely’s explanation of our emotional involvement with FREE! in the context of our fear of a loss. While his explanation did acknowledge the power of emotions, it did not, in my view, correctly identify what really goes on with our emotions. Because the situation was not correctly identified, the solution – be rational to “prevent us from falling under the spell of FREE!” – cannot and will not work.

Yes, we fear losing what we have. Dan Ariely describes experiments later on in his Predictably Irrational book to show that fact.

But are the majority of FREE! eBooks downloaded by people who fear the possibility of a loss from buying the same eBooks at prices such as $.99 or $2.99? I don’t think so. By the numbers, most FREE! eBooks go to people who will never read them. There will not be sufficient time during their lives for them to read everything that they have collected.

In two chapters of Predictably Irrational about honesty, Dan Ariely also misses that the underlying feelings for dishonest actions are probably the same as they are for FREE! When we take something that we are objectively not entitled to take, we do so because, in my opinion, we have an underlying feeling such as entitlement, an underlying need.

And like his solution in The Cost of Zero Cost chapter, his solution to dishonesty, to immediately bring forth into consciousness a moral standard, does not adequately acknowledge the underlying emotions. His solution is not intended to be permanent, and as such, in my opinion, cannot be effective.

Both of Dan Ariely’s solutions involve people referencing some externalities instead of their internal states. The better explanations come from Dr. Janov, in my view, and refer to our internal states. These are in excerpts such as here: “No one is stronger or brighter than her need because need is inextricably intermeshed with survival, and survival reigns.”

Does our preference for products and services to be FREE! derive from a lack of what should have been freely given? If our early needs were not satisfied, they are still with us in our adult lives. They drive us toward FREE!, although what we get now cannot really substitute for what we needed in our early lives.

I hope this post provides some perspectives into the power of FREE! Let me know what you think through this blog’s comments, my blog’s contact page, Paul Rice's links, PRice@PimpUrBlog.com, your review of my eBooks, or any other way you want.
--x--
a Rafflecopter giveaway

wishing Pimp Your Blog Episode Two all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Publishing Experience -- SJ Byrne

Morning All,

Today I have, SJ Byrne the author of My Butterfly telling us about her publishing experience.

--x--

Hello readers!

This is my first blog tour and I’m really excited by the experience. I find it funny as an author I have a difficult time coming up with topics to blog about. I know I could sit down and ramble on about this and that...but what do readers REALLY want to know?

I have no clue! (Insert embarrassed laugh here) Sooo, I’m going to wing it – hope that is okay!

There are a lot of interesting things going on in the publishing world these days. Books that are crap are becoming widely popular, while those that are astounding go unnoticed by the masses. Authors have been heard to say they wished they’d never written the series that changed their lives forever, and it got me thinking. Which would I prefer...fame/fortune or...not.

As an author struggling to produce a second novel, while working forty-five plus hours a week and raising my daughter with the help of dear old mom, this is something I’d think would be an easy choice to make. Fame and fortune would allow me to sit at home every day and plug away at the many ideas running rampant through my head. Wouldn’t it? Fame and fortune would remove all the woes taking up precious space in my head, thus making room for more creative thoughts to come barreling through. Wouldn’t it?

Maybe...maybe not.

Fame and fortune bring about their own set of woes and issues. Look at what J.K. Rowling has gone through because of Harry Potter’s wild success. Sure most authors would give an ear (because we need our hands to write!) to achieve that level of accomplishment...but would we really? Think of everything the woman has had to give up and change in her life. Being a superstar in any field has its ups and downs. Once you have attained that, there is no going back. We can sit in our mediocrity and wish for bigger things, but are we certain that is what we want?

Have we analyzed it from every angle and said, “Yup, I want the entire world to know my face and judge my works as though they are the whole of who I am.”? In essence, that is what happens when writers reach that level of achievement. I’ve seen it small scale through the reviews of many indie authors I know. I’ve even caught myself doing it from time to time. (Hanging head)

I think I’ve come to understand that I’d love for my books to be wildly popular, but I’d prefer to make a steady living off them that would afford me the ability to keep writing at any pace my muse sets for me. I have no delusions of grandeur waiting to be manifested...I only want to write and share those stories with anyone willing to read them.

--x--
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Wishign My Butterfly All Success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Monday, August 13, 2012

Guest Post -- Loukia Borrell

Morning All,

   Today I have Loukia Borrell, the author of Raping Aphrodite, doing a guest post for us, telling us the challenges of being a writer.

--x--

I consider my novel, “Raping Aphrodite,” to be in the historical fiction category. That was a challenge, because I had to write about an event in history that, in my experience, is not widely taught in academic settings.

Cyprus, the third largest island in the Mediterranean, after Sicily and Sardinia, was invaded and divided by Turkey in 1974. There were about 2,000 Greek-Cypriot and Turkish-Cypriot citizens who vanished and upwards of 200,000 people who were refugees, driven out of their villages into other parts of Cyprus. Some people left the island to start new lives in the United States, England and other parts of the world.

At the time, the United States was immersed in Richard Nixon’s downfall and the final months of the Vietnam War. The events in Cyprus were covered by mainstream news outlets, but they dropped off after a while, and the island was, for the most part, forgotten. It is still divided to this day. There are people who have never found loved ones, and those who did survive, were forced to make new lives elsewhere.

I had to figure out how to tell that story. I wanted it to be intriguing, suspenseful and also give readers a history lesson. I created a married couple who have survived challenges and stayed together, so readers who have withstood similar events could feel close to them. Then, I created a second story line that takes readers back to 1974, and the invasion of Cyprus, with characters from research and stories I remember from my childhood. I didn’t feel like I could make the book work if I approached it from a non-fiction perspective. I am Greek-Cypriot, but because I was born in the United States, I don’t consider myself an authority on Cyprus, so leaning toward a combination of entertainment and education for the reader seemed the smartest thing to do.

Once I figured out how I wanted to write the novel, I asked myself: Am I Greek enough to write this? Am I qualified to take on that summer and what the Cypriot people endured? Although I was not born in Cyprus, my parents were, and it is a special feeling to be able to say, “I know where I’m from.”  I felt the responsibility to tell the island’s story because once my parents pass away, I am the last true Cypriot in my immediate family. My children are only 50 percent Cypriot, so the ties to Cyprus are weakened and will continue to be so, as future generations pull away from our roots and form their own history. 

Getting people to want to learn about Cyprus will be the challenge as I move forward. I want to  educate them about the history and culture of Cyprus, and sell the book as entertainment.  I just hope the people of Cyprus will be happy with it, because this is really their story, above all.  
--x--
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wishing Loukia Borrell all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Guest Posts -- Jill Paterson

Morning All,

Today I have Jill Paterson the author Murder at the Rocks  of speaking about his thoughts on Marketing As A Bind.

--x--
Many authors see marketing as a bind. What are your thoughts?


    I can see how many authors would see marketing as a bind because it does take time away from one’s writing.  In the past, of course, it was much more likely that, other than a few appearances and book signings, the author would be left, undisturbed, to write his or her book(s) while the publisher did the marketing.  Today, however, unless you’re someone like James Patterson, publishers aren’t willing to spend time and money marketing your book(s).  So, whether you’re traditionally published or self published you need to develop an author platform and participate.

        Of course, some authors enjoy marketing and the interaction that comes with it while others shrink at the prospect.  Even so, it’s a time consuming activity whether we’re talking social media, book signings or talks to organizations.  Social media particularly can be a trap unless you set yourself limits on time spent there.

       But let’s look at the positives.  When has an author ever had the opportunity to advertise his or her book(s) as we are able to do today on all these wonderful web sites, and at no cost?  Goodreads, Twitter, Facebook to name just a few.  And then there is blogging.  Not only is a blog free to set up, but even the most computer illiterate of us can manage to create something unique.  There again, it’s not for everyone but if you do enjoy blogging it enables you to interact with your readers as well as other writers.  And while I don’t think a blog necessarily sells book(s) it will enhance your image as a writer, and be a place you can show your book(s).  And let’s not forget that you also have an opportunity to write articles you may otherwise never have written.

     So, my thoughts are that I’m more than happy to do marketing because, though time consuming, there are many positives.  One of these is the people you meet on the way.  And I wouldn’t miss that for the world.

--x--
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What are your thoughts on marketing by authors / writers?  Is it necessary or should one let the agent take care of it??

with warm regards
Abhishek

Guest Post -- Emlyn Chand

Morning All,

 Today I have Emlyn Chand, the author of Open Heart doing a guest post for us. Here we go:

--x--
How to be Popular and Keep Losers from Climbing the Social Ladder 
 by Brady Evans (for Emlyn Chand)

Hey, what’s going on? My name is Brady, and I’m here to school you on what it takes to be popular—but more importantly, what it takes to stay popular.

looser, loser, social looser
Loser
Here’s the deal, you have to be hot in order to be popular. So if you are fat, pimply, or otherwise awkward to look at, stop reading this post and go study for your science test. There’s no hope for you. 

What, to harsh? Well, at least I’m not afraid to tell you the truth, and you shouldn’t be afraid to accept it. Unless you enjoy wasting your time...

Yeah, anyway, now that we’ve gotten rid of the freaks, let’s continue. Congratulations, you are one of the “pretty people” as my GF Ronnie would say. You may have what it takes to be popular.

Next question, how good are you at sports? Are you on any JV or varsity teams? If you are good-looking and athletic, then we can safely assume you are already popular. Not too sporty? There’s still a chance you could be popular. If you’re a guy, you better be damn smooth—I mean, you either need a hot car, a hot girlfriend, or possibly a motorcycle. If you’re a girl, you need to have nice T and A, or just a tight A, or nice bouncy Ts. Hey, I am just being honest with you, people!

So next on the check list is brains. You can’t be stupid, but you can’t be too smart either—or at least you can’t show off your geek muscle on a regular basis. All A’s is okay, but sitting in the front of the classroom, raising your hand every time the teacher asks a question or any of that other pet stuff is not acceptable. Well, unless, said teacher is super hot, and your motivations aren’t... purely academic.
loser, loser cartoon, you are looser
Loser

See, it’s not too hard to be popular once you get past that first hurdle. Of course, you can’t have uber freakish tendencies, like you can’t wear eye make-up if you’re a dude or talk to yourself in the hallways or listen to stupid emo music, but provided you aren’t the self-sabotage type, the last thing you need to do is defend your popularity. What do I mean by “defend your popularity?”

Think about it, if everyone was popular than being popular wouldn’t be too special, now would it? As a member of the high school elite, it’s your job to decide who can or can’t be your friend. It’s also your job to remind the plebes that you are on top and they are just grimy gum under your shoe—especially if you fear they may unjustly gain popularity one day.

For example, Alex Kosmitoras, ugh, the kid’s a freak, walking into school with that stupid red and white stick of his, sucking up to the Chem teacher, crushing on that ugly fat girl. Yeah... So why do I care? Why do I pay him any attention? Well, if we let him ascend the ranks, he could change the criteria, and then several other unbelonging losers would infiltrate our popular core. You see the problem?
social ladder, ladder
Social Ladder
And let’s face it, his blindness could easily give him an edge since the sympathy factor could play major with some of the touchier-feelier cheerleaders. And, I can’t believe I’m saying this, but... he actually passes the first criterion. I mean, hey, I’m all man, so it’s not like that, but I see the way chicks look at him some times, and, okay, his one friend, Sharpie or whatever, she is totally hot. And well, yeah, I just gotta keep him down, you know?

So hate on me for being the one to take on the burden of keeping our upper social strata pure. I guess I just believe in something, and is that so wrong?
 
--x--

Wishing Open Heart all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Saturday, August 11, 2012

Author Interview -- Donna Brown

Morning All,

Today we have, Donna Brown, the author of Double-Take Tales answering a few questions to us:

--x--
What is one book everyone should read?
I believe everyone should read one book that they believe they wouldn't necessarily like - because you may be surprised. It doesn't matter what the book is but go outside your comfort zone. If you're lucky, it could change your reading life.

Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.
I got a review from someone I didn't know all that well (back then - now she'd probably accuse me of a being a cyber-stalker!). It made me cry because I realised I had given somebody something that they had loved.

Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book.
Because then you can tell me if you saw the twists coming and if you liked them.

Any other books in the works? Goals for future projects?
I'm about 10,000 words in to a novella (working title Harry Schmidt) but I'm a little stalled on it right now. I've been throwing round some ideas in my head for a new set of short stories but they feel a little dark right now - I need to find a way to keep them dark but with a slight twinkle of hope.

If you could have any superpower what would you choose?
Telekinetic house-tidying

What inspired you to want to become a writer?
I just love words. Whether I'm blogging, writing poetry, writing short stories or just rabbiting away to my husband, I love words so much

What's one piece of advice you would give aspiring authors?
Start building your connections in advance. Help bloggers build their audience, get involved with something in the writing community, help others. You will need enough help in the long run so pay it forward early!
--x--
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wishing double-take tales all success
Abhishek Boinapali 

Book Feature -- The Astrologer's Daughter

Morning All,

 Today I am featuring Elyse Douglas's book (The Astrologer's Daughter). Here is the book blurb.

--x--
book cover astrologers daughter, astrologers daughter
Astrologer's Daughter
Joanna Halloran, a best selling writer and astrologer, lives in a beach house overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. After a violent storm, she roams the beach, glances seaward and spots a man clinging to a piece of wreckage, being tossed helplessly. She dives in and pulls him safely onto the beach.

Robert Zachary Harrison is from a wealthy, political family. As he slowly recovers from a private plane crash, he and Joanna fall in love and spend passionate and sequestered weeks together. But because of family duty, Robert makes the painful decision to leave her and return to his fiancée and political life. He departs, not knowing Joanna is pregnant.

Twenty five years later, Senator Robert Harrison is running for President of the United States. In the midst of a contentious presidential campaign, Joanna’s daughter, who has a passion to expose secrets, seeks revenge on her father. She is also falling in love with her father’s adopted son.

As secrets emerge, Joanna and Robert meet again and confront the past and present. Robert confesses a secret that Joanna had never known. Now, on the world stage, they struggle to keep their families and careers from destruction.
--x--

Hoping Astrolger's Daughter all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Friday, August 10, 2012

Author Interview - Heather Albano

Morning All,

 Today, I have Heather Albano, the author of Timepiece answering a few questions to us.

--x--
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Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book.
It has been described as “a boomerang flung through the 1800's” in which the main character is “flipped back and forth through time like a pancake,” and it has both the Duke of Wellington and Frankenstein’s monster in it.

Tell us your most rewarding experience since being published.
People I don’t know message me on social media to tell me they liked it. And I walk around on clouds for the rest of the day.


If you could be one of the Greek Gods, which would it be and why?
Athena. She is the goddess of both wisdom and battle, which any way you look at it is a very interesting combination.


If you could live anywhere in the world where would it be?
Fortunately for me, I live pretty close already. I’ve traveled pretty extensively, and always find myself walking through other cities thinking, “This is great... but I still like Boston best.”

That said, I would love to spend a year in Venice. Most fascinating place I’ve ever been.


What is your favorite Quote?
“Writing a novel is like driving your car at night. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the entire journey that way.” - E. L. Doctorow.

If you were a super hero what would your kryptonite be?
Spider silk. I absolutely loathe the feeling of spiderwebs on my skin.

In your wildest dreams, which author would you love to co-author a book with?
In my wildest dreams, they are all so much better at this than I am, so the idea is kind of intimidating, but... I would love to work with either Lois McMaster Bujold or Tim Powers. I aspire to write the kind of “breathless adventure wrapped around a watertight plot with compelling characters” that the two of them are known for.
--x--

Wishing Timepiece all success
Abhishek Boinapalli

Swimming In Summer

Morning all,

Summer, Sun in  summer, sun with glasses, cartoon summer, summer
Summer 
 Long time and no blog-fests. So checked out here and there to find a few blog fests for myself and here we have Dog Days of Summer Blogfest.

Rules:

The rules are simple. Write a brief post on one or all three topics below:

1) Describe your favourite summer activity thus far.
2) What activities do you plan before summer is over?
3) If you could have the ultimate vacation ever, where and what would it be?

My favourite summer activity, here it goes:

Swimming, in a swim suit

swimsuit, wear swimsuit, cartoon swimsuit, swimming, swimming in pool
In A Swimsuit

in a swimming pool

summer, swimming pool, swiming pool public, swimming in summer
Pool In the City

among rocks and plants of hyderbad

swimming, swimming pool, rocks in swimming pool, rock swimming pool
Rock Swimming Pool



Hope you enjoy the summer too, though it is rainy season in my part of world. So, what are you gonna do this summer?

with warm regards
Abhishek Boinapalli
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